Fungi

Author(s):
Jose Cadena Zuluaga, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine

 Department of Medicine/Infectious Diseases
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
Assistant Chief of Infectious Diseases
Medical Director Infection Control
South Texas Veterans Healthcare System
San Antonio, TX

George R. Thompson, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine

Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases
Co-director, Coccidioidomycosis Serology Laboratory
Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology v University of California - Davis
Davis, CA

Thomas F. Patterson, MD, FACP, FIDSA Professor of Medicine

Chief, Division of Infectious Diseases
The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
Staff Physician, South Texas Veterans Healthcare System
San Antonio, TX

Published:
October 3, 2014

Abstract

The face of healthcare-associated fungal infection is changing. Candidaspp. continue to play a significant role, with high associated morbidity and mortality; however, non-albicans Candidaspp. are increasing in incidence, as are opportunistic molds and other unusual fungal pathogens.

The diagnosis of fungal pathogens has also undergone a major shift. New antigen and antibody tests, as well as rapid diagnostic polymerase chain reaction tests, are increasingly used.

Finally, the options for antifungal therapy are much broader. Newer azoles and echinocandins have proven as efficacious as traditional agents like amphotericin B, but with improved side effect profiles.